Myths vs. Facts: The Truth Behind the Myths About EMMPs

6 Common Myths Surrounding EMMPs & the Truth Behind Them

| December 27, 2018 | By Ellie Christensen, Manager of Marketing, SU Group, LLC

Over time, studies have explored the universal nature of myth creation. Many scholars agree that their key function is to bridge a logical gap. That said, it’s only natural that there would be countless myths surrounding equipment maintenance management programs (EMMPs). Programs like this, that sound too good to be true, must have an explanation, right? Well sometimes it’s as simple as it sounds.

Here are 6 common myths surrounding EMMPs and the truth behind them:

Myth 1:

EMMPs only focus on servicing your instruments cheaply. They do this without regard for current vendor or equipment manufacturer and provide less coverage than the OEM. Additionally, if a repair is too expensive, they will not cover it or they will drop coverage on that instrument.

Fact: EMMPs offer discounts while maintaining high-level service required to operate effectively and efficiently. EMMP providers base their proposals on costs and coverages as defined by the current agreements. These programs typically allow the end-user to select their service provider and even specify a preferred technician. In many cases, the clients will continue using the OEM for service. The only reason a client may elect to use an alternative vendor over the OEM is if they felt an ISO better met their needs.

Myth 2:

Response time is much longer from vendors. This means longer downtime, especially for customers who are not under contract with the OEM.

Fact: Vendors are still expected to provide high-level service and meet all industry standards/manufacturer specs when maintaining a clients’ equipment as they would under a direct agreement. New service requests (without prepaid M/C) are billable events, which provide an incentive to respond quickly (additional revenue). Some vendors may threaten worse response times since they are at risk of losing lucrative maintenance contracts, but any delays in service are created by the service vendor as an attempt to force a direct agreement.

Myth 3:

EMMPs don’t work well with vendors. Equipment maintenance management programs just aren’t compatible with current strategic vendor relationships.

Fact: EMMP providers establish long-lasting business relationships with equipment service vendors and manufacturers nationwide to best serve and support clients. When using an EMMP, most clients are surprised to find that they actually receive better service from vendors while being able to control repair costs. Users are also able to maintain vendors who have previously serviced the equipment at a lower cost.

Myth 4:

EMMPs “cherry-pick” only the profitable equipment.

Fact: EMMPs offer customized solutions to meet customers’ needs while offering cost savings, convenience, and control. Proposals are for consolidated equipment maintenance management. Coverage is offered after careful evaluation of all current agreements and is based on volume and spread of risk.

Myth 5:

EMMPs don’t include PMs. EMMP coverage plans do not include preventable maintenance (PM) visits. The customer is required to schedule their own PMs are are not notified when they are due.

Fact: EMMPs  provide corrective and preventative maintenance per the OEM or ISO contract. The EMMP provides for PM monitoring and the customer may schedule PM.

Myth 6:

Customers can’t contact the vendor directly anymore. Customers aren’t allowed to contact their vendor directly, plus technical/application support (including troubleshooting) isn’t covered.

Fact: EMMP customers have the ability to maintain direct contact with the OEMs or their preferred service providers as they would if they were under contract directly with the manufacturer. As offered and made available by the OEMs, most EMMPs provide phone support for troubleshooting, technical assistance, application support, etc. as part of the program coverage.


About the Author

Ellie Christensen has gained nearly 5 years of experience within the equipment maintenance management program (EMMP) industry serving as the manager of marketing for SU Group, LLC. She is responsible for developing content for all SU brands for clients within the educational, governmental, medical, manufacturing, and pharmaceutical fields. Ellie earned a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree from the University of Wisconsin – Whitewater where she studied journalism and marketing.

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